MINI SERIES: HORMONES – THE EFFECTS ON SKIN AT EACH STAGE OF LIFE #4

MINI SERIES: HORMONES – THE EFFECTS ON SKIN AT EACH STAGE OF LIFE #4

FORTIES – THE PERIMENOPAUSE

The lead up to the menopause can be a tricky time. Perimenopause is the phase before menopause actually takes place and normally lasts between 3 – 4 years. During this phase, hormone production begins to decline and fluctuate.

Declining oestrogen levels mean skin becomes thinner with more pronounced wrinkles such as those on the upper lip. Loss of collagen and elastin combined with reduced volume (subcutaneous fat) and bone shrinkage results in loss of structural integrity and the face literally sliding south. The severity of these symptoms will depend on UV exposure from childhood, genetics, lifestyle as well as medication which will each have an impact on the quality of skin.

The hormones that help regulate the sebaceous glands, such as oestrogen also start to decline, leading to stubborn breakouts or acne in some women. This is further aggravated by the slowing-down of the skins cell renewal process in more mature skin. As excess skin cells build

up, blocked pores already clogged with sebum, are further irritated causing inflammation.

STEPS TO TAKE;

Balance from within

Look at your diet. Balance blood sugar levels with a combination of vegetables, wholegrains with lean protein foods including meat, fish, eggs, nuts, lentils and fibre. Cut down on caffeine, sugar and alcohol. Smoking is a no no.

Get physical

The decrease of hormonal levels means increased risk of osteoporosis so keep moving with daily exercise such as walking daily for at least 30 minutes. Building in weight bearing exercise is essential to help strengthen bones. Exercise is also great for beating depression and anxiety and boosting your libido.

Supplement your diet

Introduce a good multivitamin to ensure appropriate levels of magnesium, vitamin D to channel calcium to the core of the bones and ensure daily essential Omega 3 to help With dry skin, low mood and depression.

Hormones

Next in the series: Fifties – Skin and the Menopause

Source: IIA Bulletin March 2018
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MINI SERIES: HORMONES – THE EFFECTS ON SKIN AT EACH STAGE OF LIFE #3

MINI SERIES: HORMONES – THE EFFECTS ON SKIN AT EACH STAGE OF LIFE #3

TWENTIES/THIRTIES – HORMONES & PREGNANCY

Did you know that from 26’ish women will see a different type of hormonal acne – deep, cystic bumps in the chin and jawline area and products won’t work as well on these hormonal breakouts. Other female-only hormonal changes include pregnancy, the contraceptive pill and PCOS (Polycystic Ovary Syndrome).

Many women experience acne or skin breakouts Just before ‘that time of the month’ as when hormonal levels fluctuate this in turn, stimulates the sebaceous glands. The contraceptive pill. that contains artificial hormones oestrogen and progesterone, may cause photo-sensitivity

In some women and result in pigmentation. The onset of pregnancy, is another trigger for hormonal changes that may lead to pigmentation and sometimes acne. Managing skin concerns, whilst pregnant can be very difficult as some treatments/remedies may have to be avoided.

Wrinkles and pigmentation usually start to appear as a result of damage done to skin in teens. The skin will start to appear dull as already skin cell turnover will be slowing down. Now is the time to start investing in active products and treatments to ensure firmer, younger looking skin. Having regular vitamin A based treatments and gradually increasing the dosage can help encourage healthy cell production. Using vitamin A and C orally can also enhance collagen synthesis.

Tips;

Use a mild oil based cleanser and avoid scrubs.

Start to introduce vitamin C orally and topically for strong healthy collagen formation.

Get your skin analysed and follow with a tailored skincare programme.

Introduce vitamin A orally and topically to help keep skin looking healthy (skin care expert to advise during pregnancy).

Protect the skin from the sun at all times and use an antioxidant based sunscreen.

Hormones

Next in the series: Forties – The Perimenopause

Source: IIA Bulletin March 2018
MINI SERIES: HORMONES – THE EFFECTS ON SKIN AT EACH STAGE OF LIFE #2

MINI SERIES: HORMONES – THE EFFECTS ON SKIN AT EACH STAGE OF LIFE #2

TEENS – HORMONES & PUBERTY

Although acne can start at any age, hormonal changes during puberty may trigger acne flare ups. According to the British Skin Foundation, acne affects around 80% of adolescents aged 13-18 years Why is this? During puberty, hormones that promote natural development, will raise testosterone levels in boys and girls. A side effect of this can be the overproduction of sebum which in turn can cause acne. Stress is also a contributory factor. Exams, social pressures and dealing with puberty itself can lead to a rise in the adrenal hormones, again causing the sebaceous glands to ‘overproduce sebum.

Tips;

Avoid harsh scrubs or cleansers.

Use mineral based make-up to avoid artificial chemicals that will clog the skin further.

Use vitamin A orally and topically to help normalise sebum production.

Hormones

Next in the series: Twenties/Thirties – Hormones and Pregnancy

Source: IIA Bulletin March 2018
MINI SERIES: HORMONES – THE EFFECTS ON SKIN AT EACH STAGE OF LIFE #1

MINI SERIES: HORMONES – THE EFFECTS ON SKIN AT EACH STAGE OF LIFE #1

WHAT ARE HORMONES AND WHY ARE THEY SO IMPORTANT?

Hormones are chemical messengers that send messages to the cells that they interact with. They can affect several processes in the body including growth, reproduction and metabolism. Hormones can also influence the immune system as well as our mood, causing changes in behaviour. Unsurprisingly, during the average life journey, numerous hormonal changes can reflect in various ways on our skin’s appearance and condition. For example, skin conditions commonly associated with puberty includes acne, while dryness, loss of collagen and elasticity, reduced volume are noted during menopause and surprisingly skin that suffers from breakouts is also common. The bad news is that, as we age these skin changes are inevitable. The good news is that by understanding why and what steps to take, each of us can stay in control.

Hormones-Is_It

Next in the series: Teens – Hormones and Puberty

Source: IIA Bulletin March 2018

The Rise of concern Based Skincare

SKINCARE GETS PERSONAL

As skincare professionals, we see clients seeking treatments for skin concerns such as Acne, Rosacea, Pigmentation, Dry, Sensitive or Fine Lines/Wrinkles on a daily basis. Research from the British Skin Foundation has found that 60% of British people currently suffer from or have suffered from a skin condition at some point during their lifetime.

60percent

When it comes to skincare efficacy, a ‘one size fits all’ approach is no longer enough. Discerning clients armed with more information via the internet, reality programmes and social commentary, want to treat specific skin concerns to benefit from skincare regimes tailored to meet their personal needs

SKIN CONCERN? WHAT SKIN CONCERN?

When looking at skin concerns, it appears that overall, both men and women are paying more attention to the ‘what’ and the ‘how to resolve if. A recent study of 92 dermatology clinics found a 200% rise in the number of adults seeking specialist Acne treatment’. Other skin conditions on the

rise include Rosacea and Pigmentation. Rosacea treatment enquiries are up by 92%, double compared to the year before. Hyperpigmentation, caused by the overproduction of Melanin resulting in darker patches on the skin, can not only make skin look uneven but can also give the appearance of aged skin.

200percent

What has caused this rise in skin concerns? Note: a few modern day factors that have huge impact

DIET – SUGAR AND PROCESSED FOODS

Diets high in sugar, lacking nutrients and full of processed foods can lead to a host of adverse health issues, including heart disease, weight gain and also skin problems. Yet, as a nation, we are consuming more sugar and processed foods than ever before. The World Health Organisation has stated that people should aim to get just 5% of their daily calories from sugary foods. However, the average is 12.3% for adults under 65 according to the national diet and nutrition survey (NONS). Sugar can trigger a spike in blood sugar levels. This increases levels of insulin that can cause skin problems such as acne and rosacea. In fact, an overview of research carried out over the past 50 years has found that eating foods with a high glycaemic index (GI) not only aggravated acne, but in some cases triggered it, too”,

HORMONES AND STRESS FACTORS

A survey of 4,000 people ‘ found that four out of five adults feel stressed during a typical week, while almost one in ten were stressed all the time. There is now a greater understanding of the link between stress and adverse effects on skin health. For example, stress hormones trigger overproduction of sebum that can create or worsen Acne. Raised levels of stress hormones promote transepidermal water loss resulting in dry and dull skin appearance. While in general. hormonal imbalances can play havoc on the health of skin whether caused by stress or other factors such as PMS, pregnancy, puberty and menopause.

ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

Daily exposure to free radicals, including pollution, UVA/UBA rays can also lead to various skin issues. Air pollution can lead to premature ageing by accelerating wrinkles and age spots, according to emerging scientific research’. Clients reporting sun damage is also very common. Although more than eight out of 10 people are worried about skin cancer, 72% have been sunburnt in the past year”.

UVA rays are particularly dangerous because they don’t cause burning, so there’s no immediate sign that any damage is being done. In fact, the tell-tale pigmentation marks, excessive wrinkles and leathery texture often don’t become apparent until many years later

92percent

2018 – STAND AND DELIVER. THE MOVE TO 21ST CENTURY SKIN CARE

Personalised and information based skincare is the future. Providing a consultative approach enables client confidence and loyalty through a longer term treatment programme. Therapists should be taking a three pronged approach when treating their clients:

  1. Start with a detailed skin analysis, in order to really understand your client’s skin. Use skin imaging technology and take photos regularly to show progress.
    Discuss and design a personalised treatment programme – the #100DayReset programme is ideal for both new and existing clients. Combine professional treatments with a personalised homecare routine to address the client’s concern.
  2. Treat from within. Skin nourished from the inside looks healthy on the outside. Clients who use appropriate supplements are likely to achieve far superior results.
  3. Use topical treatments that are about efficacy and integrity.
    Topical vitamin treatments that contain vitamin A have shown to make a dramatic difference to skin concerns.

If clients are using the wrong kind of make-up it could undo all the hard work. Encourage the use of non-comedogenic cosmetics to avoid aggravating concerns. Remember, mineral make-up, such as Jane Iredale, is the best kind for clients with problematic skin as it allows the skin to breathe.

Don’t worry about discussing your skin issues with a professional skincare expert, we are here to help and support you, to get your skin in its best possible condition.

Call us on 01283 561208, or pop in for a chat.

DON’T TRY THIS AT HOME

DON’T TRY THIS AT HOME

The importance of visiting a professional to carry out potentially risky treatments was thrown into the spotlight time and again in 2017. Much to the frustration of beauty therapists and techs, it seemed stories of consumers injuring themselves as a result of DIY treatments were rarely out of the news.

In May, the British Association of Dermatologists (BAD) reported a surge in people suffering from allergic reactions after using home gel-polish and acrylic kits, ranging from sore cuticles to the natural nails lifting from the nail beds.

It wasn’t just consumers at fault though – the adverse reactions were also attributed to techs mixing products and technologies from different brands systems.

Separately, a survey revealed just how often people injure themselves when attempting to remove their own pubic hair, with 14% admitting they had sustained injuries that required medical attention.

Even more seriously, experts began warning consumers against buying skin peels from eBay following reports of people suffering severe facial burns. Campaign group Safety in Beauty received 27 complaints of chemical peels gone wrong from products containing banned ingredients such as trichoroacetic acid.

Don’t take the risk, contact your local qualified Beauty Therapist for advice.

MINI SERIES: STRESS #3 – TOP TIPS TO COMBAT THE EFFECTS OF STRESS

MINI SERIES: STRESS #3 – TOP TIPS TO COMBAT THE EFFECTS OF STRESS

MINI SERIES: STRESS – TOP TIPS TO COMBAT THE EFFECTS OF STRESS

EAT TO FUEL YOUR BODY
Poor nutrition can result in immunosuppression. A healthy diet high in fresh fruits and vegetables, good quality protein and healthy fats will provide you with the fuel to cope with stressful situations. Keeping your blood sugar levels steady by eating smaller meals throughout the day has been shown to help reduce cortisol levels. Incorporating a well formulated multi-vitamin/mineral supplement into your diet is an ideal way to ensure that you’re getting the right nutrients on a daily basis

EXERCISE – GOOD FOR BODY AND SKIN
Exercise is a great way not only to reduce stress, but to also achieve healthier skin. However, the type of exercise you do should involve relaxation techniques such as deep breathing and mindfulness, for example yoga and Tai Chi. People often assume that a lot of exercise is the cure for stress but too much rigorous exercise can have the opposite effect, so it’s important to build in rest. Getting more oxygen to flow to the brain will result in a reduced physical and mental response to stress. Studies have shown that exercise not only reduces stress, but it also encourages blood flow to your skin. Exercise produces endorphins which can help improve sleep, which will in turn help reduce stress. You should be moving but not over-doing it. If your body has at least eight hours rest, it will renew and rejuvenate itself which will also show in the quality of your skin.

GET TALKING
A good remedy to help with stress is often just talking. It’s important to take a step back and talk to someone about whatever is causing stress. Talking things through can help relieve stress and put a different perspective on a challenging situation. Sharing problems with a close friend or family member rather than ‘bottling up’ issues can be an effective way to start tackling stress. Sharing your burden can often help to lighten the load, and knowing that you have someone to talk things through with and discuss your issues can make the world of difference

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Original article: IIAA Bulletin November 2017